USMILNET
April 20, 2014, 07:20:54 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Welcome one and all to the USMILNET forums! Look around and enjoy your time here. Spread the word!
 
   Home   Help Login Register  

WELCOME TO USMILNET
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: USCGC STRATTON - WELCOME ABOARD  (Read 14976 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
BuoyJumper
Administrator
Expert Master Blaster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 15566


NEVER SUBMIT


WWW
« on: December 21, 2008, 11:29:54 am »



Third National Security Cutter Stratton Builds on
Lessons Learned from NSC Construction and Testing

By Linda M. Johnson

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Coast Guard is making several significant improvements to its third National Security Cutter, Stratton, based on lessons learned from sea trials and analysis on its first NSC, USCGC Bertholf. These improvements include construction process efficiencies, enhanced functionality and better hull design.

The Coast Guard just completed its design review of the structural enhancement changes in early December and expects to make four significant improvements to Stratton over the next year, according to Cmdr. Douglas M. Schofield in the project resident office at the Northrop Grumman shipyard in Pascagoula, Miss.

Stratton is the Coast Guard’s first white-hull patrol cutter to be named after a woman in 20 years. The third of eight NSCs, she is slated for delivery in 2011. A ceremony
marking the start of fabrication work, which is typically celebrated after the first 100 tons of steel are cut for a ship, was held this past September and construction on Stratton began this past July

 

Design Improvements

Stratton incorporates a number of efficiencies and process improvements from the construction of the first two NSCs: Bertholf, which was delivered in May 2008, and Waesche, which is on track for delivery in 2009.  “We will continue to capitalize on lessons learned and efficiencies based on the first two NSCs,” said Capt. Michael Hay****, the NSC project manager.

One of the most significant process improvements being made to Stratton is a 50 percent reduction in the number of grand blocks used to assemble the ship’s hull. The Coast Guard used 29 grand blocks, which are multiple units stacked together in large assembly halls away from the
waterfront, to assemble Bertholf but expects to use only 14 grand blocks to assemble Stratton.

“Using 14 grand blocks instead of 29 will potentially reduce construction hours and make it more efficient to build out the units on the Stratton,” Schofield explained.  As Hay**** put it, the reduction in the number of grand blocks “will allow us to put more modules together under one roof, in controlled circumstances and protected from the weather.”

Another improvement Stratton is an enhanced replenishment at sea station, meaning a redesigned refueling area that will be more efficient and more ergonomic for cutter personnel.
The third enhancement to Stratton is an improved gas turbine removal route that will make it easier to remove and repair the gas turbine modules that power the cutter.

Lastly, Stratton will benefit from enhanced fatigue structural modifications that will reduce the risk
of structural fatigue over the cutter’s 30-year life cycle. These ongoing modifications involve installing high strength steel reinforcements at the cutter’s fatigue points based on computerized models.

“The Coast Guard’s Technical Authority will also conduct tests on Bertholf over the next several years to further validate and improve the model that we are using to predict fatigue life,” Hay**** explained.

According to Schofield, “this is an art more than a science as computer models [of a ship’s fatigue points are fairly new and]... aren’t 100 percent accurate.”

*** Continued On Next Reply ***
Logged

  Save a Boat - Ride a Coastie ... 
"And in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years" ..........Abraham Lincoln
My CGC Mesquite Photo Album (Click Here)                  MY COAST GUARD CHANNEL PAGE  (Click Here)
BuoyJumper
Administrator
Expert Master Blaster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 15566


NEVER SUBMIT


WWW
« Reply #1 on: December 21, 2008, 12:03:43 pm »

Fatigue Life Assessment Project


PACIFIC OCEAN—Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf, first National Security Cutter,
makes way alongside Coast Guard Cutter Boutwell, one of the service’s
378-foot High Endurance Cutters. Bertholf and sister ships such as Stratton,
are among the newest and most capable patrol cutters the Coast Guard has
ever built. USCG photo by PO3 Michael Anderson.


The Coast Guard chairs a new international team of government and industry experts that is assessing the fatigue life of Coast Guard cutters by comparing the ship’s actual fatigue points from testing during sea trials to analytical fatigue models.

Known as the Fatigue Life Assessment Project, the team is conducting a structural monitoring campaign and maintenance validation work on Bertholf to further improve the understanding of ship fatigue life, increase the confidence level in predicting fatigue life for future ship designs and forecast the structural maintenance needs of Legend-class Coast Guard cutters.

The first-of-its-kind project team, which was formed last year, includes 10 participating organizations:  the American Bureau of Shipping, Bassin Dessais des Carenes, Bureau Veritas, Royal Dutch Navy, Lloyd’s Register, Northrop Grumman Ship Systems, the U.S. Navy’s Office of Naval Research, Schelde Naval Shipbuilding, MARIN (Maritime Research Institute Netherlands) and the Coast Guard.

Project participants will gain insight into the physics and operational factors that govern ship fatigue damage, data from sea trials and model testing to validate tools, and detailed insight into the validity of contemporary fatigue assessment concepts and tools.  The project is important to the global shipbuilding community because it will provide a significant set of real-world combatant structure and ship motion data correlated with environmental conditions such as waves and wind.  

It is particularly important to the Coast Guard since the NSC is such a crucial element of the Coast Guard’s modernization and recapitalization program. At 418 feet, the NSC is the largest and most technologically advanced white-hull patrol cutter ever developed for the Coast Guard.

It is the flagship of the Coast Guard’s fleet, capable of speeds in excess of  28 knots and prepared to execute the most challenging maritime safety, security and natural resource stewardship missions.

Naming


Captain Dorothy Stratton left and to the right a young Lieutenant Spar talking with then Coast Guard Commandant VADM
Russell Waesche for which the 2nd National Security Cutter is named.


With all of these pioneering design changes, it is fitting that the third NSC is named after one of the Coast Guard’s true pioneers: Capt. Dorothy C. Stratton.  Stratton served as the founder and first director of SPARS, the Coast Guard’s Women’s Reserve during World War II.

Stratton became the first woman accepted for service as a commissioned officer in the Coast Guard’s history when she was transferred from her position as a lieutenant with the Navy’s Women Appointed Volunteer Emergency Service to the office of the Commandant in late 1942
to organize the Coast Guard’s first Women’s Reserve.

Stratton coined the name SPARS as a contraction of the service’s motto “Semper Paratus” and its English translation “Always Ready.” She has been quoted as saying, “a spar is often a supporting beam and that is what we hope each member of the Women’s Reserve will be.”

During her four years as director of SPARS, Stratton recruited and led 10,000 enlisted women and 1,000 commissioned officers. She left the Coast Guard shortly before SPARS was demobilized and upon retirement in 1946, was awarded the Legion of Merit medal for her contributions to women in the military.

Stratton died in 2006 at the age of 107.  Less than 10 Coast Guard cutters have been named after women in the service’s 218-year history, according to Robert Browning in the Coast Guard Historian’s Office. Stratton, the first Coast Guard white-hull patrol cutter to be named after a woman in more than 20 years, joins another female namesake vessels in the Coast Guard fleet such as 175-foot Keeper-class buoy tenders Maria Bray, Abbie Burgess, Ida Lewis, Barbara Mabrity and Katherine Walker. The most famous Coast Guard vessel named after a woman is Harriet Lane, a cutter commissioned in 1984 that is still in service out of Portsmouth, Virginia.

CG History:  Captain Stratton And The USCG SPARS
Original Article In PDF
« Last Edit: July 20, 2009, 11:54:20 pm by BuoyJumper » Logged

  Save a Boat - Ride a Coastie ... 
"And in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years" ..........Abraham Lincoln
My CGC Mesquite Photo Album (Click Here)                  MY COAST GUARD CHANNEL PAGE  (Click Here)
EX-CG-GM
Iron Sam Flint, feared patriarch of the pirate Flint clan
Master Blaster
*******
Offline Offline

Posts: 8689


There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2008, 12:53:14 pm »

Quote
...Fatigue Life Assessment Project,...

And the acronym?  F.L.A.P.----Great!   ROTF
Logged

BuoyJumper
Administrator
Expert Master Blaster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 15566


NEVER SUBMIT


WWW
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2008, 05:56:39 pm »

Good thing the CG didn't name it "Fatigue Life Operational Project" ........!   ROTF ROTF ROTF ROTF
« Last Edit: December 21, 2008, 06:15:23 pm by BuoyJumper » Logged

  Save a Boat - Ride a Coastie ... 
"And in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years" ..........Abraham Lincoln
My CGC Mesquite Photo Album (Click Here)                  MY COAST GUARD CHANNEL PAGE  (Click Here)
mike220
Nobody move! I've dropped my brain.
Expert
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 290


Aggie Snipe


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2008, 05:52:08 pm »

Stratton? I read it was supposed to be the Hamilton.  Huh??2
Logged


We've fed the sea for a thousand years, yet she calls to us, unfed.
BuoyJumper
Administrator
Expert Master Blaster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 15566


NEVER SUBMIT


WWW
« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2009, 11:42:39 pm »


The Associated Press
Monday, July 20, 2009; 4:52 PM

WASHINGTON — In a first for a first lady, Michelle Obama is sponsoring a future Coast Guard cutter.

Construction of the cutter Stratton began Monday in Pascagoula, Miss., when the U.S. Coast Guard and Northrop Grumman laid the ship's keel at the defense contractor's shipyard.

As sponsor, Mrs. Obama promises to be involved in the life of what the service is calling a "national security cutter."

The White House says Mrs. Obama's decision is an extension of her commitment to support servicemembers and their families. The Coast Guard says it's the first time a president's wife has signed on as a sponsor.

Stratton is named after Capt. Dorothy Stratton. She was director of the Guard's women's Reserve during World War II.

Original Article
Logged

  Save a Boat - Ride a Coastie ... 
"And in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years" ..........Abraham Lincoln
My CGC Mesquite Photo Album (Click Here)                  MY COAST GUARD CHANNEL PAGE  (Click Here)
BuoyJumper
Administrator
Expert Master Blaster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 15566


NEVER SUBMIT


WWW
« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2009, 12:06:16 am »



Video Release
Date: July 20, 2009
Contact:  District 8 Public Affairs

Rear Admiral Ronald Rabago announces the
first lady Michelle Obama as the Stratton's sponsor



Click on photo to view the video announcement

Pascagoula, Miss. — Rear Admiral Ronald Rabago, assistant commandant for aquisition and chief aquisition officer speaks about the history of the keel laying ceremony, the Coast Guard Cutter Stratton's namesake, Capt. Dorothy C. Stratton, who was the first woman accepted into the first women to be accepted for service in the Women's Reserve of the U.S. Coast Guard, and the ships sponsor, first lady Michelle Obama. Rabago acted as a direct representative for Obama during the ceremony. The ceremony was performed at Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding-Gulf Coast in Pascagoula, Miss., July 20, 2009.  U.S. Coast Guard video / Petty Officer Tom Atkeson

First lady's initials added to
keel of 3rd National Security Cutter

 
WASHINGTON — The U.S. Coast Guard and Northrop Grumman laid the keel for the future Coast Guard Cutter Stratton, the service's third National Security Cutter, at 1 p.m. Monday at Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding's Gulf Coast shipyard, Pascagoula, Miss., ceremoniously marking the beginning of Stratton's construction.

First lady Michelle Obama will serve as Stratton's sponsor.  This is the first time a first lady has ever sponsored a Coast Guard cutter.  As the sponsor the first lady will be involved in the life of the cutter.  This is Obama's first formal association with a United States Coast Guard cutter and serving as Stratton's sponsor is an extension of her commitment to supporting America's men and women in uniform and their families.

"I am honored to serve as sponsor of the Coast Guard Cutter Stratton, named after one of the most extraordinary women to serve our nation in uniform," said Obama.  "Every day, the United States Coast Guard keeps our families and communities safe at home and contributes to the defense of our nation overseas.  This vessel will embody the strength of today's military and the enduring courage of our Coast Guard's men and women."

Press Release
Video Release
« Last Edit: July 25, 2009, 06:24:14 pm by BuoyJumper » Logged

  Save a Boat - Ride a Coastie ... 
"And in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years" ..........Abraham Lincoln
My CGC Mesquite Photo Album (Click Here)                  MY COAST GUARD CHANNEL PAGE  (Click Here)
BuoyJumper
Administrator
Expert Master Blaster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 15566


NEVER SUBMIT


WWW
« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2009, 12:27:14 am »




Source: Northrop Grumman Corp.

Photo Release — First Lady to Serve as Ship's Sponsor for U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Stratton; Keel Laying Held for Ship to Honor First Female Commissioned Officer in USCG

PASCAGOULA, Miss., July 20, 2009 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — As dozens of invited guests and shipbuilders gathered, Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) honored the memory of a Coast Guard pioneer by hosting a keel laying ceremony for the U.S. Coast Guard National Security Cutter Stratton (WMSL 752) here today.


USCG Rear Adm. Ronald Rabago, the Coast Guard's assistant commandant for
acquisition, observes as Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding welder Julie "Ann" Gordon
welds the initials of First Lady Michelle Obama onto the keel plate for the National
Security Cutter Stratton at the keel laying event held Monday in Pascagoula, Miss.


Stratton is named in honor of Dorothy C. Stratton (1899-2006), the U.S. Coast Guard's first female commissioned officer and director of the SPARS, the United States Coast Guard Women's Reserve, during World War II.

First Lady Michelle Obama has been designated as the ship's sponsor.

"I am honored to serve as the ship's sponsor of the United States Coast Guard cutter Stratton," Mrs. Obama wrote in a letter read by U.S. Coast Guard Rear Adm. Ronald J. Rabago, assistant commandant for Acquisition and Chief Acquisition Officer (CAO), during the keel laying ceremony. "I'm especially pleased that the cutter's namesake is Capt. Dorothy Stratton, a pioneer in our nation's military history. She is a source of inspiration for countless women in uniform and for young women and girls who may one day serve in our nation's armed forces."

"It's a great day to be a shipbuilder," said Irwin F. Edenzon, vice president and general manager of Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding-Gulf Coast. "We're honored the First Lady has agreed to be the sponsor of this great ship and we welcome her as part of our shipbuilding family."

Stratton is the third of eight National Security Cutters that comprise the Legend class, the most technologically sophisticated class of ship in the history of the Coast Guard. With its 418-foot length and 4,300 ton full load displacement, the NSC is the largest of the new multi-mission cutters.

"We are all pleased and impressed with the dedication of the men and women of the Coast Guard's Gulf Coast Project Resident Office and of the Pascagoula shipyard," said Rear Adm.. Rabago.

"Their commitment to excellence in producing the National Security Cutter class to meet the demands for Coast Guard missions is truly inspiring. These eight cutters can't come soon enough, as they will be replacing a very old 378-foot Endurance-class cutters, which have been in service since the 1960s."

The first NSC, USCGC Bertholf (WMSL 750), has been commissioned and recently accomplished its first drug interdiction off of the coast of Guatemala. The second ship, Waesche (WMSL 751) is still under construction.

Powered by a twin propeller combined diesel and gas turbine power propulsion plant, the NSC is designed to travel at 29 knots maximum speed. The cutter includes an aft launch and recovery area for two rigid hull inflatable boats, a flight deck to accommodate a range of manned and unmanned rotary wing aircrafts, and state-of-the-art command and control electronics.

Northrop Grumman Corporation is a leading global security company whose 120,000 employees provide innovative systems, products, and solutions in aerospace, electronics, information systems, shipbuilding and technical services to government and commercial customers worldwide.

CONTACT:  Bill Glenn
          Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding
          (228) 935-3972
          william.glenn@ngc.com

Original Article
Logged

  Save a Boat - Ride a Coastie ... 
"And in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years" ..........Abraham Lincoln
My CGC Mesquite Photo Album (Click Here)                  MY COAST GUARD CHANNEL PAGE  (Click Here)
BuoyJumper
Administrator
Expert Master Blaster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 15566


NEVER SUBMIT


WWW
« Reply #8 on: July 25, 2009, 06:45:23 pm »



Photo Release
Date: July 21, 2009
Contact:  District 8 Public Affairs
USCG Photos:  Damian R. Nastri

Northrop Grumman’s Gulf Coast Shipyard hosts keel
laying ceremony for the National Security Cutter Stratton




PASACAGOULA, Miss. – In the photo above left, Coast Guard Project Resident Office Gulf
Coast personnel, led by their Deputy, Mr. David Blackburn, stand at attention for the Keel
Laying ceremony for the National Security Cutter Stratton (WMSL 752), at Northrop Grumman’s
Gulf Coast Shipyard on Monday, July 20, 2009.  Assistant Commandant for Acquisition, Rear Adm.
Ronald J. Rábago above right, stands in front of the keel authenticated by First Lady Michelle
Obama’s initials following the Keel Laying ceremony.



The Coast Guard Aviation Training Center Mobile Color Guard above left, presents the colors at
the opening of the Keel Laying ceremony for the third National Security Cutter Stratton (WMSL
752), at Northrop Grumman’s Gulf Coast Shipyard.  Deputy Program Executive Officer and Deputy
Director of Acquisition Programs, Ms. Giao Phan (CG-93d) above right, stands in front of the keel
authenticated by First Lady Michelle Obama’s initials following the Keel Laying ceremony for the
National Security Cutter Stratton.

Photo Release
Logged

  Save a Boat - Ride a Coastie ... 
"And in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years" ..........Abraham Lincoln
My CGC Mesquite Photo Album (Click Here)                  MY COAST GUARD CHANNEL PAGE  (Click Here)
BuoyJumper
Administrator
Expert Master Blaster
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 15566


NEVER SUBMIT


WWW
« Reply #9 on: July 25, 2010, 11:51:53 am »



Press Release
Date: July 23, 2010
Contact:  District 8 Public Affairs
American Forces Press Service
By Fred W. Baker III

First Lady Christens Cutter,
Praises Women in Service




PASACAGOULA, Miss. –First Lady Michelle Obama today became the first-ever presidential spouse to christen a new U.S. Coast Guard cutter during a ceremony held in Pascagoula, Miss.

It took the First Lady two tries but she successfully broke open the traditional bottle of champagne against the bow of USCGC Dorothy C. Stratton, named after the first woman to serve as a commissioned officer in the U. S. Coast Guard.

Obama praised Stratton’s accomplishments, which included serving as the first director of the SPARs, the Coast Guard Women's Reserve created in 1942 by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The name is an acronym of the Coast Guard motto Semper Paratus, translated as “Always Ready.” A spar in nautical terms refers to a supporting beam. Stratton is credited for creating the name.

“As a woman, and as a mother of two daughters, as an American, I stand in awe of her life of service,” Obama said of Stratton. “And after all these years later, all of us -- whether you’re a woman or a man, Coast Guard or another service, whether you’re military or civilian -- every American can be inspired by her example.”


Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Robert J. Papp, addresses the SPARS at a christening ceremony for Coast Guard Cutter Stratton, July 23, 2010. The cutter is named in honor of Capt. Dorothy Stratton who was appointed director of the SPARS in 1942 by Adm. Russell Waesche. U. S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Casey J. Ranel.

Like other women's Reserves at that time, SPARs was created to free men from stateside service in order to fight overseas. Stratton volunteered to serve in the military after the bombing of Pearl Harbor despite having no military background and a strong academic future.

“When a colleague at Purdue University said … ‘Dorothy, you can’t afford to do this,’ her reply was simple. She said, ‘I can’t afford not to,’” Obama said.

Obama told the crowd of about 3,000 gathered for the ceremony that Stratton demonstrated the power of a single individual to bring about real change.

Stratton traveled the country, giving speeches, recruiting other women, including, for the first time in the Coast Guard, African American women.

“To so many of those young women, she became their mentor; she became their champion and their inspiration. And she built them into a proud 11,000-strong Coast Guard Women’s Reserve,” Obama said.

During her service, Stratton laid the groundwork to break down the barriers of women’s service in the military and left in its wake a legacy that lives today, Obama said.

“It also freed a new generation of women to believe in themselves -- as radio operators, air traffic controllers, parachute riggers and machinists. These women were strong, independent, confident,” she said.

After World War II, it would be another 30 years before women started to be fully admitted into the Coast Guard and other services. Now they serve as an integral and indispensable part of the military, Obama said.

“Today, women not only serve on ships, they command them; serve as Vice Commandant of the Coast Guard. They have proven their courage in battle in Iraq and Afghanistan,” Obama said. “Today it is absolutely clear for all to see that women in uniform are indispensable to the American military.”

While on her trip to the Gulf Coast, Obama also met with members of the Coast Guard helping in the oil spill cleanup.

Obama said she has issued a national challenge to America to support and engage its military families.

“One percent of Americans may be fighting in our wars and protecting our country, but 100 percent of Americans need to be supporting our troops and their families,” she said. “Everyone can do something. Everyone can play a part.”

Stratton earned the Legion of Merit before leaving the Coast Guard in 1946. She died in 2006

DOD text and photo
« Last Edit: July 25, 2010, 11:58:02 am by BuoyJumper » Logged

  Save a Boat - Ride a Coastie ... 
"And in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years" ..........Abraham Lincoln
My CGC Mesquite Photo Album (Click Here)                  MY COAST GUARD CHANNEL PAGE  (Click Here)
cuttercoasty
Marksman
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 72





Ignore
« Reply #10 on: August 03, 2010, 08:09:02 pm »

Stratton? I read it was supposed to be the Hamilton.  Huh??2

I remember that too.  I remember also hearing that the name was then changed because the current 378 WHEC Hamilton would still be in service when the 3rd hull was put to sea.

Guess it would be confusing having two CGC Hamilton's in service at the same time.

Didn't that happen with the old Mac and new Mac a few years back?
Logged

GreenET1
Expert
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 349





Ignore
« Reply #11 on: August 05, 2010, 10:51:42 am »

Stratton? I read it was supposed to be the Hamilton.  Huh??2

I remember that too.  I remember also hearing that the name was then changed because the current 378 WHEC Hamilton would still be in service when the 3rd hull was put to sea.

Guess it would be confusing having two CGC Hamilton's in service at the same time.

Didn't that happen with the old Mac and new Mac a few years back?

The old Mac was decomissioned the day before the new Great Lakes Ice Breaker was commissoned as the New Mac.
Before commissoning the new Mac was refered to as the GLIB or somthing like that.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

E-Mail the Administrator

Custom Search

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.1.1
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.384 seconds with 39 queries.