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Author Topic: Women In Today's Coast Guard  (Read 50556 times)
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« Reply #30 on: October 01, 2009, 12:12:07 pm »



News Release
Date: September 30, 2009
Contact:  District 5 Public Affairs

Rear Adm. Sally Brice-O'Hara testifies
on U.S. Coast Guard search and rescue efforts




WASHINGTON — The U.S. Coast Guard's Deputy Commandant for Operations is scheduled to testify during a House of Representatives Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation  Subcommittee hearing on Coast Guard search and rescue, Wednesday, 10 a.m., House Rayburn building room 2167, here.

The subcommittee, chaired by Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., will hear testimony from Rear Adm. Sally Brice-O'Hara, detailing the Coast Guard's efforts on search and rescue.

The Coast Guard, as the federal agency responsible for maritime search and rescue operations, saved more than 4,000 lives while responding to more than 24,000 search and rescue cases in 2008.

At the heart of search and rescue are the Coast Guard's search and rescue controllers, trained by the Coast Guard's National Search and Rescue School.  For 43 years the school has provided training designed to help reduce the time spent searching for those in distress by aggressively pursuing leads and obtaining all information available.  By reducing search times and search areas, the Coast Guard can save more lives, more efficiently use Coast Guard resources and place fewer Coast Guard personnel at risk.

Only about 10 percent of search and rescue cases involve actual searches for people in distress, with about eight percent of those searches spanning less than 24 hours and about two percent lasting more than 24 hours.

Given the great difficulties inherent in finding people missing at sea due to variations in wind and seas and the vast areas that need to be searched, the Coast Guard continues to acquire new technologies to more rapidly locate persons in distress at sea. These technologies include the Search and Rescue Optimal Planning System, self-locating datum marker buoys, Rescue 21, 406 MHz direction finders on Coast Guard aircraft and high-powered infrared and optical camera systems for vessels and aircraft. Even with advances in technology there is no substitute for boater education, vessel examinations and inspections, proper safety equipment and training when it comes to reducing the severity of maritime accidents.

"The SAR system is reactive in nature – we activate the system based on information received at a specific point in time and respond accordingly," said Rear Adm. Sally Brice-O'Hara, the Coast Guard's deputy commandant for operations. "However, the success of the search and rescue mission relies heavily on mariners doing their part to ensure they are prepared to survive an accident at sea. When mariners are prepared and can sustain themselves until help arrives, our job of rescuing gets much easier, and the mariner’s probability of survival increases considerably. There are many prevention programs that by their very nature support the SAR mission. We would not be as successful in the arena of SAR without the efforts of the National Recreational Boating Safety Program, Commercial Fishing Vessel Safety program, and those members who are involved in marine safety regulatory and standardization efforts. These programs play a crucial role in ensuring mariners are properly equipped and trained to respond to emergencies in the maritime environment."

To download Brice-O' Hara's prepared remarks please click  HERE after10 a.m., and for updates from her testimony, follow https://twitter.com/uscoastguard, #USCGSAR.

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« Reply #31 on: October 01, 2009, 09:52:29 pm »



OBITUARY:
Vet helped pave way for women


Genevieve McKay, a longtime Glendale resident who served during
World War II, died. She was 89


GLENDALE, CA. — Genevieve McKay, a pioneer for career women who served in World War II, died Wednesday in Glendale. McKay, 89, was part of the first class of women admitted into the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn., in the early days of WWII, and was stationed in San Francisco for three years. She appeared in uniform in newspaper photos and in recruitment articles, and her military uniforms ended up in the National World War II Museum.

McKay was born April 9, 1920, in Juniata, Penn., and soon after her family moved to Detroit. She eventually worked as a secretary in the radiology department for a Navy doctor. It was this exposure to the military atmosphere and career options that led her to enlist in the Coast Guard, where she was accepted as an officer because of her college degree.

She wanted to reenlist as her term was drawing to a close, but she met Harvey McKay, an Air Force lieutenant, and was married in Old St. Mary’s Church in San Francisco’s Chinatown. The growing family moved extensively within Oregon and California as her husband was transferred.

McKay worked for the Glendale Police Department after her youngest child was enrolled in school. She also worked as secretary to the Glendale City Clerk and eventually retired from that position. But at 61, she applied for a job with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, where she worked until she was 65.

She was also a 20-year volunteer botanical tour guide for Descanso Gardens.

McKay is survived by four children: Greg, Diane, James and Elizabeth Allured; as well as two grandchildren, William and Jonathan Allured. She was preceded in death by her daughter, Suzanne.

A visitation will be held from 3 to 8 p.m. Monday at Callanan & Woods-Scovern Mortuary in Glendale, with the Funeral Mass at Holy Family Catholic Church at 10 a.m. Tuesday. The burial will be at San Fernando Mission Cemetery immediately following the Mass.

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« Reply #32 on: October 02, 2009, 08:26:54 am »

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She was beautiful!
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« Reply #33 on: October 04, 2009, 09:53:48 pm »



Captain Cari B. Thomas, C.O., U.S. Coast Guard Training Center Cape May  



Captain Cari Thomas Advises
Women to Live Balanced Life

By Lauren Suit

AVALON — Captain Cari B. Thomas, commanding officer of the Coast Guard Training Center in Cape May, gave the keynote address to a group of businesswomen. She said that despite experience saving lives, commanding ships and with 25 years of military service, she is on a quest for balance.

Thomas told the women, who were assembled for that annual Women in Business conference at the Golden Inn Hotel and Conference Center, that she has lived her life as four different women rolled up into one.

The first and most noticeable, she said, was as an officer. Thomas is a 1984 graduate of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy and completing an assignment as the Atlantic Area Resource Di-rector, Training Center Cape May, is her 13th permanent duty station in nearly 25 year of service.

The second and most treasured part of her life, Thomas said, was as a wife. She said she been married 23 years to her husband Gary.

The most misunderstood part of her life has been spent as a mother, she said.

“My daughter leads a life that is a bit nontraditional,” Thomas joked. “Her mom does wear combat boots.”

Thomas said that her career has taken her away from her daughter’s birthdays and first dates and that she does regret not being there during the milestone moments.

The aspect of Thomas’ life she admits paying the least attention to is living life as a woman. She told the group of women that there was a time in her life when she was hav-ing trouble with a boss and she forgot to take care of herself.

“My blood pressure was out of control, my cholesterol was way too high and my weight was too high,” she said.

Thomas said she made the decision to take up fitness and was able to complete a triathlon and half-marathon.
She told the women in that a quote by Albert Einstein best compliments her life

“‘Life is like a bicycle and to keep balanced you have to keep moving,’” she said, “And I’m doing my best to keep moving.”
The conference also featured six different seminars about how women can maximize potential in a challenging climate.

Cape May County Hearld Original Article
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« Reply #34 on: October 05, 2009, 08:37:08 am »

This is one terrific woman.. I really like her! I've also met VADM Crea and RADM Brice-O'Hara and they are fantastic too. True positive role models for our Coasties, male and female alike.



Meet U.S. Coast Guard Captain Carol Bennett

 

May 8, 2009 — En route to missions as far away as Greenland, the Azores and the Caribbean, more than 30 U.S. Coast Guard pilots arrive and depart Air Station Elizabeth City on a typical day. To keep the aircraft flying, employees of the Aviation Logistics Center overhaul approximately 40 aircraft and modify another 30 each year, while the Aviation Technical Training Center turns out about 400 students per year in aviation maintenance, avionics electrical and aviation survival technicians programs.

These men and women report to work at one of the U.S. Coast Guard's busiest bases - Support Center Elizabeth City, home to five commands that represent the Coast Guard in northeastern North Carolina.

To keep the base facilities humming is Capt. Carol Bennett.

As Commander of the Support Center, she is responsible for facilities upkeep and for providing support and security for more than 2,200 active military, civilian employees and contractors.

"I am like the Mayor, if you will, of this whole facility," said Bennett. "We are the municipal city that makes this work, and we're all about operational excellence."

It is a job Bennett loves.

A financial management specialist and cutterman, Bennett came to Support Center Elizabeth City from Coast Guard headquarters in Washington, D.C. As Chief of the Office of Resource Management, she oversaw an $8.6 billion annual budget, which included a $3.3 billion payroll.

Throughout her career, she has had three tours afloat; reported to shore assignments in New York and California; and served as Coast Guard Liaison Officer to the Department of Defense Joint Forces Command and Commander, Fleet Forces Command in Norfolk, Va., where she assisted in the Navy command center during events leading up to Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Since reporting to the Support Center in 2008, Bennett's top priority is developing a master plan and seeking appropriations for major capital improvements - such as a new $48 million, 50,000 square-foot rescue swimmer training facility that will break ground in 2010.

"That's a big, big deal," said Bennett. "We're very excited about that."

Recently, the Coast Guard's support of the new $13 million Elizabeth City-Pasquotank Aviation Research and Development Commerce Park drew praise from regional and state economic development leaders.

Located on property adjacent to the base, the park will open in phases over the next few years and is expected to be a big draw for aviation and aerospace companies - especially those that do business with the Coast Guard. On completion, the park will connect the 7,200 square-foot runway shared by Coast Guard and the Elizabeth City-Pasquotank Regional Airport. The Elizabeth City State University School of Aviation Science will be located on site, as well as a College of the Albemarle Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) maintenance-certification facility.

Graduates of the higher education programs will be well-positioned to fill good-paying jobs with the park's tenants - which Bennett sees as a real boost for the region.

"Building the park is a huge step in moving this area forward," said Bennett. "The key is not to be dependent on people coming here, but to grow the work force organically. We've got to do everything we can to give them the hometown advantage."

For prospective employers, Bennett says Elizabeth City is a great place to be. "It offers a great climate, a good cost of living for employees and if you have a hankering for a metropolitan area, its right up the road," she said.

Having just relocated from the fast pace of the nation's capital city (250 miles north), Bennett says she prefers the region's easy stride - and she loves the people. As Commander, she represents the Coast Guard as an ex-officio member of regional boards, serves on advisory committees and enjoys helping out with community programs. Just recently, the base adopted J.C. Sawyer Elementary School, where Coast Guard Support Center personnel spearhead a tutoring program.

"People who join the Coast Guard join to make a difference," she said. "We `want Elizabeth City to be a Coast Guard city," she said.

Just the Facts

Capt. Carol Bennett was the first woman from New York to graduate from the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn., and her graduating class (1981) was only the second class of women to do so.

The Elizabeth City Coast Guard presence consists of five major commands: Air Station Elizabeth City, Support Center Elizabeth City, Aviation Logistics Center, Aviation Technical Training Center, and National Strike Force Coordination Center.

Salaries attributed to Support Center Elizabeth City totaled $72 million according to a fiscal year 2007 financial report. It is among the largest employers in northeastern North Carolina.

Coast Guard Air Station Elizabeth City was the backdrop for actors Kevin Costner and Ashton Kutcher, who portrayed rescue swimmers in the 2006 motion picture, "The Guardian." The actors were seen around town during the filming, and about 200 local Coast Guard extras appeared in the movie.

The Coast Guard's motto is "Semper Paratus," which means "Always Ready."

Original Article

Kelly ... Thanks for helping out and posting this great
article on Capt Bennett .. Much appreciated.  I tweaked
it a little and added a link to the original article ... Ron
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« Reply #35 on: October 06, 2009, 03:44:14 pm »

iCommandant

Web Journal of Admiral Thad Allen
Thursday, October 01, 2009

VADM Vivien Crea's Retirement and
Gold Ancient Albatross Change of Watch


Shipmates,

We had a busy day on Thursday. We traveled to Elizabeth City, NC for several events including the retirement of Vice Admiral Vivien Crea (relieved as Vice Commandant on 7 August), the relief of the Gold Ancient Albatross, the ribbon cutting for the first MH 60 T operational unit, and a brief by the Aviation Logistics Center leadership on their outreach efforts to recruit a diverse workforce. These events coincided with the Annual "Roost" of the Ancient Order of the Pterodactyl (the Coast Guard Aviation Association). We will be blogging about each of the events over the next day or so.

 
Commandant Allen hands Vice Admiral Crea her Certificate Of Retirement.  Later officer and enlisted "ancients" stand with the recently retired Ancient Albatross Vice Adm. Vivien Crea in front of a vintage painted C-130 Hercules aircraft Thursday Oct. 1, 2009, at Air Station Elizabeth City, N.C. Second to the right, the newest member to the group, Rear Adm. Gary T. Blore, received the nostalgic flight suit as he became the 22nd Ancient Albatross. The Ancient Albatross award was initiated in 1966, the golden anniversary of Coast Guard aviation, and signifies the longest serving Coast Guard aviator on active duty. (U.S. Coast Guard photo/PA2 Andrew Kendrick)  

The following report was carried in the Daily Advance in Elizabeth City.

Blore replaces Crea as Ancient Albatross
USCG commandant attends ceremony
By DIANA MAZZELLA
Staff Writer

Thursday, October 01, 2009
On any other day, it might be strange to see a Coast Guard vice admiral donning a crown of flowers or another admiral being handed a Pterodactyl egg. But at Ancient Albatross Change of Watch ceremonies, just about anything goes.

Coast Guard Commandant Thad Allen, who was in attendance for Thursday's Change of Watch ceremony, said as much when he commented about the diversity of Coast Guard uniforms being worn for the event at Air Station Elizabeth City.

"Thanks for joining us at one of the more unique events in the Coast Guard where any uniform can be worn," Allen said.

Some of the hundreds of active and retired Coast Guard personnel wore the regular Coast Guard blues, while aviators wore green flight suits.

Vice Adm. Vivien S. Crea, however, had on the costume attracting the most attention.

As the outgoing holder of the Ancient Albatross award, Crea wore a knee-length leather flight jacket, white scarf, goggles, leather helmet and accompanying earrings of helicopters and airplanes.

Crea retired shortly before the ceremony after 36 years in the Coast Guard. One of the first female Coast Guard pilots and the first female Ancient Albatross, she served as vice commandant until a few months before her retirement.

The Ancient Albatross award is presented to the longest-serving active duty Coast Guard aviator. The Ancient Order of the Pterodactyls, a Coast Guard aviation fraternity, in town this weekend for its annual meeting, funds and coordinates the Change of Watch ceremony.

Allen stressed the importance of remembering Coast Guard aviation's beginnings and celebrating the Coast Guard's aviation past that includes traditions like the Ancient Albatross ceremony and humanitarian service through daily missions. The traditions and history have led to new milestones such as the Coast Guard?s assistance to the U.S. Navy by providing marksman and observers in naval helicopters.

"So it's really, really important to understand the significance of this beyond the weirdness of it," Allen said.

And there was a lot of weirdness.



ABOVE LEFT:  Vice Adm. Vivien Crea passes on the distinction as the Ancient Albatross as she retires Thursday Oct. 1, 2009, at Air Station Elizabeth City, N.C. The Ancient Albatross award was initiated in 1966, the golden anniversary of Coast Guard aviation, and signifies the longest serving Coast Guard aviator on active duty. The nostalgic flight suit was passed on as Rear Adm. Gary T. Blore became the 22nd Ancient Albatross. (U.S. Coast Guard photo/PA2 Andrew Kendrick)

ABOVE LEFT MID:  Vice Adm. Vivien Crea passes on the distinction as the Ancient Albatross as she retires Thursday Oct. 1, 2009, at Air Station Elizabeth City, N.C. The Ancient Albatross award was initiated in 1966, the golden anniversary of Coast Guard aviation, and signifies the longest serving Coast Guard aviator on active duty. The nostalgic flight suit was passed on as Rear Adm. Gary T. Blore became the 22nd Ancient Albatross. (U.S. Coast Guard photo/PA2 Andrew Kendrick)

ABOVE RIGHT MID:  Rear Adm. Gary T. Blore became the 22nd Ancient Albatross as Vice Adm. Vivien Crea passed on the distinction as she retired Thursday Oct. 1, 2009, at Air Station Elizabeth City, N.C. The Ancient Albatross award was initiated in 1966, the golden anniversary of Coast Guard aviation, and signifies the longest serving Coast Guard aviator on active duty. (U.S. Coast Guard photo/PA2 Andrew Kendrick)

ABOVE RIGHT:  Vice Adm. Vivien Crea applies for the Coast Guard Auxiliary after retiring and passing on the distinction as the Ancient Albatross Thursday Oct. 1, 2009, at Air Station Elizabeth City, N.C. The Ancient Albatross award was initiated in 1966, the golden anniversary of Coast Guard aviation, and signifies the longest serving Coast Guard aviator on active duty. The nostalgic flight suit was passed on as Rear Adm. Gary T. Blore became the 22nd Ancient Albatross. (U.S. Coast Guard photo/PA2 Andrew Kendrick)


As Crea handed off her Albatross garb to Rear Admiral Gary T. Blore, she put on the symbols of her new post-Coast Guard life as a flower child. Dressed in tie-dyed T-shirt, blue flight suit, beaded necklaces, sunglasses and flower crown she prepared to take on her future while celebrating her time as an aviator.

Though she has served in the second-highest job in the Coast Guard, it wasn't her time in command as a bureaucrat or flight officer that she enjoyed most. She loved any flight she took whether it was over ice sheets near Greenland spotting whales, striking birds on takeoff or the hair-raising experience of teaching a co-pilot to land.

"The reigning Ancient Albatross has surpassed all of his or her contemporaries in longevity, surviving a career in aviation begun with ulcerated instructors and terror-stricken crews," the program read.

Blore, commander of the Coast Guard's 13th District in Seattle, Wash., is now the 22nd Ancient Albatross since the award was first handed out in 1965.

Enlisted aircrew members began to receive a separate Ancient Albatross award in 1990. It is now held by Senior Chief Petty Officer Pete MacDougall.

Aside from the gear, Blore was given a Pterodactyl egg by the aviation association to represent the young and future aviators that he must nurture. The Foundation for Coast Guard History presented him with a print of an early Coast Guard airplane to remind him to share the agency's history with those who step inside his office.

Blore lauded Crea for her efforts of promoting professional development while serving as the Ancient Albatross. He encouraged new and experienced pilots to relish their role in this exciting time in Coast Guard aviation in which the C-130, CASA, and helicopters join the Coast Guard's discussion of deploying unmanned aerial vehicles.

Following the ceremony, the air station held a second brief ceremony in a nearby hangar to mark the first operational MH-60T Jayhawk in Coast Guard service.



ABOVE LEFT:  The three current enlisted "ancients" stand before the American flag after a ceremony where Vice Adm. Vivien Crea passed on the distinction as the Ancient Albatross Thursday Oct. 1, 2009, at Air Station Elizabeth City, N.C. The Ancient Albatross award was initiated in 1966, the golden anniversary of Coast Guard aviation, and signifies the longest serving Coast Guard aviator on active duty. The nostalgic flight suit was passed on as Rear Adm. Gary T. Blore became the 22nd Ancient Albatross. (U.S. Coast Guard photo/PA2 Andrew Kendrick)

ABOVE RIGHT:  The officer and enlisted "ancients" stand in front of a vintage painted C-130 Hercules aircraft Thursday Oct. 1, 2009, at Air Station Elizabeth City, N.C. Second to the right, the newest member to the group, Rear Adm. Gary T. Blore, received the nostalgic flight suit as he became the 22nd Ancient Albatross. The Ancient Albatross award was initiated in 1966, the golden anniversary of Coast Guard aviation, and signifies the longest serving Coast Guard aviator on active duty. (U.S. Coast Guard photo/PA2 Andrew Kendrick)
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An updated version of the HH-60J, the helicopter has updated communications, glass ****pit, and law enforcement and sensing equipment, according to a Coast Guard release. The helicopter, stationed in Elizabeth City has been sent out on missions since May 2009. It includes ground mapping technology, advanced weather radar that differentiates between heavy and light rain, and a moving map that allows pilots to be more aware of surrounding hazards.

Doris Creps, public affairs officer for the Coast Guard Aviation Logistics Center in Elizabeth City, said the upgrade to the Jayhawks began a few years ago with a prototype. By the project's end, all 42 of the Coast Guard's Jayhawks at eight air stations will have the improvements.

Creps said the new package includes five touch screens that replaced panels of dials.

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« Reply #36 on: October 07, 2009, 10:36:49 am »

Thank you for your service Admiral Crea. 



You have been an outstanding role model for active duty Coasties and I know you will be greatly missed by Admiral Allen and the staff.  Good to see you joining up with the CG Aux ... at least you won't be entirely gone from the USCG.
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« Reply #37 on: November 12, 2009, 01:24:52 pm »



Officer Overcomes
Family’s Skepticism to Serve

By John J. Kruzel
American Forces Press Service


(CLICK PHOTO FOR A LARGER IMAGE)
Coast Guard Lt. Hannah Bealon, right, shares
a moment with Ruthanna Weber, a 94-year-old
World War II veteran and an original member
of Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency
Service, or WAVES, at a Veterans Day ceremony
at the Women in Military Service for America
Memorial in Arlington, Va., Nov. 11, 2009.
DoD photo by John Kruzel


ARLINGTON, Nov. 12, 2009 — When Coast Guard Lt. Hannah Bealon was growing up, she was intrigued by the stories of her uncles’ courage and sacrifice in the Vietnam War.

“At an early age, I knew I wanted to volunteer for military service,” she recalled yesterday in remarks at a Veterans Day event here at the Women in Military Service for America Memorial.

But when Bealon told of her family of her dream to join the military ranks, she was rebuffed.

“I remember one of my uncles said, ‘Being a woman in the military is quite difficult, and men won’t respect you,” she recalled. Adding insult to injury, he told her that if she married a military person, she would have great health-care benefits.

“You could only imagine how heartbroken I was,” Bealon continued. “This was the same uncle who told me I could do anything a man could do.”

But Bealon persevered in the face of her family’s skepticism that a woman could succeed in a military career, and started weighing her options. Unsure of which branch and in which capacity she wanted to serve, she found herself inside a Coast Guard recruiter’s office when she read the writing on the wall -- literally.

“When I entered the Coast Guard recruiter office, there was an old, worn sign on the wall,” she recalled. “The sign had a woman who said, ‘In the Coast Guard, the only place I can’t go is in the men’s restroom.’” She said she knew right then and there that the military had a path to progress that she wanted to follow.

After considering all service branches, Bealon chose the Coast Guard. Of its 68,000 employees, 40 percent are women, she noted. Also, it is the only service that allows women to hold all ranks and positions – including its top post of commandant, she added.

In her Veterans Day remarks yesterday, Bealon mentioned some of the trailblazing Coast Guard women who helped create gender parity, including Capt. Eleanor L’Ecuyer, the first female captain; Janna Lambine, the service’s first female aviator; and Colleen Cain, the first woman killed in the line of duty.

“To my beloved veterans: Thank you for your service, devotion, duty, and sacrifices. You will not be forgotten,” she continued. “For I am your legacy, and my children will be your future.”

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« Reply #38 on: December 01, 2009, 12:52:05 pm »

Through the Coast Guard Compass we will be following the path of Ensign Lindsay Cook.



New Series – Ensign Cook Reports
By cbraesch
August 13, 2009

The Compass would like to invite you on a journey with Ensign Lindsay Cook. As a newly commissioned officer straight from civilian life and into a uniform, ENS Cook has a lot to learn about the Coast Guard, its missions and its people. The “Ensign Cook Reports” series will follow her over the next several months as she deploys to various Coast Guard units. Join ENS Cook as she blogs about her experiences and tells stories from the field…
-CBraesch

___________________________________



Hello Everyone, I am Ensign Lindsay Cook.

About a year ago I graduated from Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Washington, and aspired to join the Coast Guard. I put in my package to attend Officer Candidate School (OCS) and was determined to be a Coastie even if I didn’t get selected to attend OCS. Well, I got in! I started OCS in January and was commissioned in May 2009.

My first assignment (fresh out of OCS) is a staff tour as a public affairs officer in Portsmouth, VA. This is rare…I just got extremely lucky. Since I started my career in the CG at a staff tour and don’t have any first hand operations experience, my CAPT decided to get me some operational time. I am stoked about learning from my fellow shipmates and seeing what goes on everyday in the CG. What better way to learn than getting hands-on experience with subject matter experts! Not only do I get to experience the CG’s operations, but I also have the opportunity to share my experiences and my shipmate’s stories. It’s my hope that as I learn and blog, both you and I gain a better understanding of the CG’s operational missions and get to know the diverse group of people who make these missions happen.

Please know that I am learning about the CG’s missions first hand during each visit, so I don’t really know what to expect, but feel free to ask me questions anytime. I’m not a subject matter expert and may not be able to answer your question immediately but I will do my best to find an answer. If after I do a little research and I’m still stumped, then I’ll just be honest and say I don’t know.

I am about to take you on my journey as I learn about the CG’s missions first hand during each unit I visit. There’s a lot in store and I can’t wait. Let’s do this….

-ENS Lindsay Cook

Ensign Cook Reports from aboard the CGC Forward
Ensign Cook Reports – CGC Forward Part II
Ensign Cook Reports – Air Station Elizabeth City
Ensign Cook Reports – Air Station Elizabeth City Part III
Ensign Cook Reports – Air Station Elizabeth City Part IV

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« Reply #39 on: December 01, 2009, 01:31:18 pm »



Woman from Ellicott City a Coast Guard pioneer
1st female academy graduate to be chosen for rear admiral
By Don Markus
November 30, 2009


Captain Sandra Stosz

One of Sandy Stosz's favorite childhood memories is of the trips her family took each summer from Ellicott City to her grandparents' home near Cape Cod, and the little rowboat that she and her three brothers were allowed to take out on the Great Bay when they were deemed old enough.

"She always loved the water," Stosz's mother, Joy, recalled recently.

"Those humble beginnings," as Stosz jokingly called them, led to her pursuing a career in the U.S. Coast Guard and her recent promotion to rear admiral lower half. Stosz, 49, became the first female graduate of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy to earn the Coast Guard's fourth-highest rank.

Stosz's life turned on this course during her junior year at Mount Hebron High School in 1976.

"A neighbor of ours brought a newspaper article saying that the Naval Academy would start accepting women," Stosz said. "I remember thinking about all the cool things you could do there and it said they would give you a stipend. I had to look up the word in the dictionary to see what a stipend was."

Stosz was able to get a nomination from then-newly elected Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes. As a backup, Stosz also applied to the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn.

"Who knew what the Coast Guard Academy was?" Stosz said.

When she found out she was an alternate at the Naval Academy and had been accepted at the Coast Guard Academy, her mother insisted she take the more solid offer. It turned out to be a prescient decision: Had she gone to Annapolis, Stosz would not have been assigned to a ship upon graduation.

"What I heard was that there was a lot of resentment toward the women who graduated from the Naval Academy from the men because the women were assigned to some cushy office job and the men were immediately shipped out," said Stosz, who graduated in 1982.

Assigned to the icebreaker Glacier and headed for Antarctica, Stosz began what has been a nearly three-decade adventure. Her first trip included stops in Tahiti and New Zealand and a four-day stay in Peru, where she and other newly commissioned ensigns toured the Inca ruins of Machu Picchu.

"I always wanted to see the world," she said.

Stosz even met her future husband while at sea. Assigned to the icebreaker Polar Star in 1983, Bob Volpe, a fireman on the ship, noticed the only woman on board. "It was hard not to notice me," she said. "I don't even remember him."

They were married two years ago and live in Arlington, Va.

Stosz acknowledges that the one thing she has sacrificed in building her career was a family.

"It's hard being away at sea; sometimes you're away for six months at a time," Stosz said.

Stosz spent about 12 years at sea and fulfilled a longtime goal of commanding her own ship. She did it twice, once on an ice-breaking tug on the Great Lakes and the other on a medium-endurance cutter patrolling the North Atlantic and Caribbean.

Among her missions were drug and alien migrant interdiction, enforcement of fisheries and search and recovery. Stosz has also served as military assistant for the secretary of transportation and the Coast Guard commandant's executive assistant. Stosz received her master's in business administration from Northwestern University.

After 16 assignments, Stosz is now director of enterprise strategy, management and doctrine oversight at U.S. Coast Guard headquarters in Washington.

"I'm too old to be at sea," Stosz said.

Stosz doesn't seem to mind being landlocked. Even when she visits her mother, who now lives at Stosz's grandparents' home, Stosz doesn't spend much time on the water. Her grandparents are gone and so is the old rowboat.

"I had plenty of time on the water," she said. "When all you see is blue water for six months at a time, it's the last thing you want to do. It's nice to go out for a hike in the woods or a walk and see green."

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« Reply #40 on: December 22, 2009, 10:33:41 pm »



News Release
Date: December 21, 2009
Contact:  District 13 Public Affairs

First female Coast Guard
rescue swimmer retires



Capt. Anne Ewalt, Chief of Staff for the 13th Coast Guard District presents a Meritorious Service Medal to Lt. Cmdr. Kelly Larson (formerly Mogk), the 13th District Command Center Chief, during her retirement ceremony here, Dec. 21, 2009.  Larson joined the Coast Guard in 1984 and became the first female to complete Navy Rescue Swimmer School on May 23, 1986.  (USCG photos by PO3 Tara Molle)
 
SEATTLE — The first female Coast Guard rescue swimmer retired after more than 25 years of distinguished Coast Guard service Monday.

Lt. Cmdr. Kelly Larson (formerly Mogk), the 13th District Command Center Chief,  joined the Coast Guard in 1984 and became the first female to complete Navy Rescue Swimmer School on May 23, 1986.

One of Larson's most memorable rescues occurred January of 1989 earning her an Air Medal and an in-person congratulations by then President George H.W.  Bush. Larson played a key role during the rescue of a downed Air National Guard F-4 pilot who had ejected over the Pacific Ocean.  Her actions included exposing herself to the hypothermic elements to free the downed pilot from his parachute and remaining in the water for a back-up rescue helicopter for transport. This allowed the rescue helicopter to immediately transport the pilot for medical care.

Larson attended Officer Candidate School in Yorktown, Va., in 1993, graduating to be commissioned as an ensign in the Coast Guard.

Ten years after becoming the first female Coast Guard rescue swimmer, Larson attended the Navy's Flight Training Command in Pensacola, Fla., earning her second set of aviation wings and became a Coast Guard rescue helicopter pilot.

Larson's list of awards include but are not limited to a Meritorious Service Medal, an Air Medal, two Coast Guard Commendation Medals, three Coast Guard Achievement Medals, Commandant's Letter of Commendation, five Presidential Unit Citations, four Meritorious Unit Citations, the Coast Guard "E" Ribbon, three Coast Guard Good Conduct Medal and two Special Operations Service Awards.         

For more information on Larson please visit the U.S. Coast Guard Historian's Office site at http://www.uscg.mil/history/

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« Reply #41 on: March 05, 2010, 12:04:58 pm »



Aviation Maintenance Technician Third Class
Molly Bowser, Air Station Barbers Point, Hawaii
 



KAPOLEI, HI — Aviation Maintenance Technician Third Class Molly Bowser, stationed at Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point, poses for an advertising photo shoot highlighting women in the Coast Guard. AMT's inspect, service, maintain, troubleshoot and repair aircraft engines, auxiliary power units, propellers, rotor systems and associated airframe and systems-specific components.

Above right:  Aviation Maintenance Technician Third Class Molly Bowser, stationed at Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point, gets ready to lower the rescue basket on a training flight around Oahu Island in an HH-65 Dolphin helicopter. Aviation Maintenance Technicians act as in-flight crewmen, hoist operators, and flight mechanics on Coast Guard air operations.





Aviation Maintenance Technician Third Class Molly Bowser, stationed at Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point.  AMT's inspect, service, maintain, troubleshoot and repair aircraft engines, auxiliary power units, propellers, rotor systems and associated airframe and systems-specific components.

U.S. Coast Guard photos by Petty Officer First Class CC Clayton
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« Reply #42 on: March 14, 2010, 08:26:11 pm »



Captain Jean Butler first woman graduate
of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn.
 


Jean Butler above left the first woman graduate of the U.S. Coast
Guard Academy in New London, Conn., in 1980, chats with then vice
commandant of the Coast Guard, Vice Adm. Thomas J. Barrett in 2004.  
Today she is working with Admiral Stephen Rochon growing the tech-
nical side of the Coast Guard.
 

U.S. Coast Guard is growing its technical side
The service seeks diverse applicants to fill civilian positions.
Special programs and partnerships help the recruitment effort

March 14, 2010

'The shared core values of honor, respect and devotion to duty, and the clear appreciation of diversity at the U.S. Coast Guard lead to a tightly knit culture and exciting civilian opportunities," says Rear Admiral Stephen Rochon, director of personnel management.

The Coast Guard is a military, multi-mission, maritime service and one of the nation's five armed services. Its part of the mission to protect America focuses on the country's ports, waterways and coasts, as well as on international waters and any maritime region where it might need to support national security.

The Coast Guard has seen considerable growth on both its active-duty and civilian sides since the attacks of September 11, 2001, particularly in technical areas.

Technical pros see the results of their work daily, Rochon says. "Their work at a high-tech command center can help recover 10,000 pounds of cocaine, or help save lives, 4,000 every year. Some of our people go out to sea to do these things, but we also need people to develop and maintain the hardware and software that enable them to do so."

Rochon, who enlisted in 1975, says the Coast Guard has substantially increased its diverse representation. When he began, there were only seventy African American officers; today there are 300. Of the civilian workforce, 25 percent are minorities and 36 percent are women.

In 1993 the Coast Guard launched a study of its workforce diversity and since then has been "heavily immersed in making itself look like the mosaic of America," Rochon says.

As part of that effort, Coast Guard leaders implemented a strategy in 2002 that moved recruitment offices to areas with higher concentrations of diverse applicants. That meant closing down fourteen of its 100 recruiting offices and repositioning ten of them.

Civilian specialties currently needed at the Coast Guard include naval architects, CEs, MEs and IT specialists. IT folks are needed for the Integrated Deepwater System program. Deepwater is an integrated, performance-based approach to upgrading existing assets, as well as adding newer, more capable ships and planes. The project has been a big factor in the growth of the Coast Guard's civilian workforce.

IT pros are also needed in each Coast Guard directorate. Directorates include human resources, logistics, IT and operations, and each has its own IT staff. A centralized IT function with 250 IT employees is based at headquarters.

To help with its outreach efforts, the Coast Guard turns to groups like the National Urban League, NAACP, Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, the Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Awards Conference and the National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education. It has partnerships with HBCUs and most schools that have at least a 25 percent minority representation.

The service also runs several programs aimed specifically at boosting diversity. The Blue 21 flight program is designed to bring more diverse officers into Coast Guard aviation. This June, the first two candidates, both minorities, will graduate from flight training. One of the new grads will be the Coast Guard's first female African American aviator.

The civilian career entry opportunity program fills the pipeline with entry-level civilian-career opportunities. Participants, about 50 percent of whom are minorities, stay in the program for a year and are assigned mentors. This year, there are about twenty openings.

Coast Guard military and civilian members have a number of opportunities to network. The National Naval Officers Association (NNOA), for African American and other minority naval officers, includes members from the Coast Guard, Navy and Marines. So does the Association of Naval Service Officers (ANSO), for Hispanic officers. Civilians can join as associate members of NNOA and as full members of ANSO.

Recently, the service formed the Coast Guard Women's Leadership Association at headquarters and has started to expand it to other offices, says Captain Jean Butler, chief of Coast Guard diversity staff. The group is sponsoring a women's leadership symposium with the Navy's Women Officers Professional Association this summer, she adds.

The Coast Guard has developed diversity training that's presented at various locations by a roving team, Butler says. The Coast Guard's civil-rights staffs are also trained and available to share their knowledge.

To help employees with work/life balance issues, the Coast Guard has an office of work/life. Staff help military and civilian Coast Guard members handle issues like child care, family advocacy, wellness and physical fitness.

When job demands permit, the Coast Guard offers compressed work schedules and flexible work schedules. There's also a leave donation program that allows employees to give their unused vacation time to others who may need extra time off for emergencies. Civilian employees generally have an easier time making use of these programs, Butler notes.

Coast Guard employees have opportunities to give back to their communities, and are eligible for volunteer-service awards for their efforts. Through the Coast Guard's Partners in Education program, they help local schools with math or reading tutoring, and participate in career days and after-school clubs. Another program called First Book involves giving books to young children to encourage reading.

"We have employees who are Big Brothers and Sisters, Boy Scout leaders, Girl Scout leaders, baseball and soccer coaches, and we highly encourage that kind of involvement," Butler says.

"The Coast Guard is an organization with a great purpose that has opportunities for engineers and technically trained people, both in its military and civilian workforce," Rochon declares.

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« Reply #43 on: March 17, 2010, 12:08:51 pm »



Lieutenant Jeanine McIntosh Menze
first African American female pilot
 



Lieutenant Jeanine McIntosh Menze, Coast Guard Pilot

My name is Jeanine McIntosh Menze, and I’m the first African American female pilot for the United States Coast Guard. My story started out from a young age when I used to live in Jamaica. I was born there, and the side of the island we used to live on was the final approach path for Kingston International, so I used to see the airplanes landing there or flying into Kingston pretty much on a daily basis, and I was always fascinated with airplanes from that point on. After high school I went to college at Florida International University and pursued an international business degree, and also I started flying civilian part time on the side.

So between classes and between my work schedule, I was picking up my private license, I got my instrument rating, I got a commercial license and ultimately became a flight instructor during college, and then after college I applied for the Officer Candidate Program for the Coast Guard, and that’s when my Coast Guard journey kind of began.

The Coast Guard provided different type of missions that I was interested in. We had humanitarian missions, law enforcement missions, and search and rescue missions. And I think out of all the other services, that’s what initially drove me to join the Coast Guard. After attending college I applied for the Officer Candidate Program which is a 17-week indoctrination program into the Coast Guard.

Officer Candidate School is different in the sense that it’s a big leadership test, and not only do you get physical conditioning, you learn about the Coast Guard and military practices, but you learn to become a leader.

I would definitely recommend the military to my family members, to friends, to anyone that’s interested in a military career. Out of high school, it’s a great program, and out of college it’s even better because there’s a lot more different job opportunities, a lot more leadership roles that you can participate in, that civilian counterparts probably can’t match right away in an entry level position

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« Reply #44 on: March 31, 2010, 11:28:06 am »



Feature Story Release
Date: March 30, 2010
Contact:  District 13 Public Affairs
Story by:  PO3 Tara Molle and PO3 Loreanne Switzer

The Women's Reserve, America's backbone


In the photo above left "the original nineteen" as they were called, were the first group of Coast Guard SPARS to be assigned to the 13th
Naval District from boot camp.


SEATTLE — Lt. Dorothy Bevis (middle photo above) was a SPAR and worked in the 13th Naval District in Seattle during WWII. She served as the Personnel Procurement Officer, which put her in charge of recruiting both men and women into the Coast Guard. U.S. Coast Guard photo
 
Many people are familiar with the famous tagline ‘We Can Do It’ from a recruiting poster featuring Rosie the Riveter representing the women who worked in factories during World War II (WWII). This poster would become one of many seen throughout the war, recruiting women to take over jobs so that men could be sent to fight. While WWII was being fought by men overseas, much of their successes can be traced back to the women working in their absence on the home front. Every military branch would utilize women in various jobs throughout the war.

Semper Paratus Always Ready, better known as SPARS, was the United States Coast Guard Women’s Reserve created Nov. 23, 1942. The need for the women’s reserve was substantial. SPARS took many Coast Guard jobs such as telephone and radio operators so that they ‘could release a man to sea.’

On Feb. 24, 1943 the first five SPARS arrived in the Pacific Northwest and reported to then 13th Naval District office in Seattle. The women were originally Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service – U.S. Naval Women’s Reserve (WAVES) and were given the opportunity to transfer into the Coast Guard as SPARS. Seattle was then and remains today the headquarters for the 13th Coast Guard District encompassing all of Wash., Ore., Idaho and Mont.

Originally, the Seattle office had requested 175 SPARS from their boot camp training facility in Cedar Falls, Iowa. The class had only 150 women, so only 19 were sent. ‘The original nineteen’ as they were called, were the first group of SPARS to be assigned to the 13th Naval District from boot camp.

When the SPARS arrived in Seattle, they were informed that the housing situation was ‘very bad.’ Only a few rooms in the Earl Hotel had been obtained and it was only for a limited amount of time. Many of the women had to stay in the apartments of radiomen and communicators who were on leave or deployed.  A few families in the Broadmoor District (a gated residential community) of Seattle had opened their homes to the SPARS. Some stayed in guest rooms while others had to occupy maid’s quarters or recreation rooms. In June 1943, the Coast Guard took over the Assembly Hotel giving a fully furnished and centralized place for the SPARS to call home.

Lt. Edith Munro (above right) had been assigned to be in charge of the SPAR barracks at the hotel. She was in charge of watching over the SPARS home lives. Munro was best known for being the mother of Douglas Munro, who joined the Coast Guard in 1939 and went on to be the only Coast Guardsman to be awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his heroic actions coming to the aid of 500 Marines trapped in the South Pacific , Sept. 1942.

Munro took the oath to join the SPARS two hours after accepting the Medal of Honor for her son. When asked why she joined the SPARS she said, “We are a Coast Guard family, through Doug. He loved his service. I am very happy to be eligible to serve in it.” Munro’s statement was released in an article by The Palm Beach Post, “Medal of Honor Goes to Mother,” May 28, 1943

She was commissioned a lieutenant junior grade and was then assigned to the 13th district in Seattle where her son had originally enlisted. That same year, Munro was also given the honor of being designated SPAR of the year.

Another SPAR of note in the Seattle office was Lt. Dorothy Bevis. She was assigned into the recruiting position for women and only one year later was promoted to be the Personnel Procurement Officer putting her in charge of recruiting both men and women into the Coast Guard.

Bevis began to work immediately in her new position by reaching out and speaking at various clubs and organizations to recruit more women to become SPARS. Her efforts paid off as businessmen began to quickly offer to pay for billboards and posters advertising for SPARS. As a result, 60 posters appeared throughout Seattle. This was the first time this kind of advertising appeared in the U.S.

Many SPARS conducted recruiting in their off time. They were required to give talks as they were the only ones who could relate their experiences and answer questions that arose about the special service. This task proved to be slightly more challenging as they were sent to speak in other Washington cities such as Anacortes, Bellingham and Tacoma in addition to their daily routines. Many times they would be out until 1-2 a.m., and were expected to be back on the job before 8 a.m. the next day. The SPARS were met with much curiosity. Since they were the first women to wear uniforms in Seattle, they were watched constantly not only by fellow military personnel, but by civilians as well.

In June 1944, a survey reported that 401 SPARS in Seattle were assigned positions and 249 men were released of their duties and sent to war. This did not mean that it took twice as many women to fill men’s positions, but the work was heavily increasing. In addition, only 17 men who already had SPAR replacements were still in the office. The turnover was happening rapidly. Almost as soon as a SPAR arrived, she was able to do the job needed so that the man could be sent to war.

Although there were a great number of SPARS already employed, the need for their help continued to grow. In Aug. 1944, there were 57 officers and 10 more were requested. For other positions, the Seattle office requested an additional 269 SPARS saying that they were utilized to better advantages in the 13th District than any other district around the U.S.

The 13th Naval District was famous for the fact that its women were rated and advanced. Ratings are general occupations that consist of specific skills and abilities. The District Coast Guard Officer (DCGO), believed in their abilities and saw to it that they were given responsibility. However, the responsibilities could not be given until a SPAR held the rating, so advancement became an issue. When the women joined the reserve they were not given ratings right away, unlike their male counterparts.    The DCGO stated in a letter, “…in order to have contentment and efficient operation, there must be a flow of promotions.” (History of the Women’s Reserve: Thirteenth Naval District) In other words, the SPARS would work even better and would be happier if they had goals to reach promotion.

Once given the opportunity, the SPARS studied frequently. Men watched and said things like, ‘Never knew the Coast Guard had so many scholars!’ Women made their ratings and quickly advanced in them. Although they were quite proud of their ratings, many SPARS were afraid to show it by trying to conceal their badges because the men in their positions before them had been unrated seamen for long periods of time without being advanced.

Although the SPARS were short lived and were no longer needed by the end of WWII in 1945, they were able to pave the road for women joining the Coast Guard in later years. The SPARS had bittersweet, mixed feelings about departing their military lives and heading back to the traditional roles they would continue to play in society. Even in this, the SPARS left significant impressions not only in the13th Naval District but also in the Coast Guard as a whole.

“We have an esteem of the greatest depth for the Coast Guard and with mixed emotions we are happy and sad to depart. Though we leave the actual service, the common bond, which will make us swell with pride each time we see the Coast Guard shield or hear the Coast Guard mentioned, will always be a part of us.” (History of the Women’s Reserve: Thirteenth Naval District)

While the days of SPARS, WAVES and other women’s reserve units in the 13th District and the rest of the U.S. are long since over, they left a strong legacy and their sacrifices would not go in vain. Women have now become active duty members of every branch of the military working side by side with the men on the home front and fighting over seas. ‘We Can Do It’ just might have to be changed to ‘We Did It.’
 
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